What Is a Township in Real Estate? Know Your Boundaries

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Written By Justin McGill

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If you’re looking to buy property, it’s important to understand what is a township in real estate. A township in real estate refers to an area that is designated for administrative or governmental purposes. This can impact your property search or sale, so it’s important to be aware of what is a township in real estate.

Here we’ll explore the boundaries of townships and how they can affect your real estate transaction.

What is a Township in Real Estate?

A township in real estate is a specific area of land that is designated by the government for a particular purpose. In the United States, townships are typically used for rural areas or small towns.

They are usually divided into smaller sections called lots, and each lot is typically owned by a different person or family.

What Is The Main Purpose of a Township?

The services that townships provide vary greatly, but the most common are road maintenance and the administration of public assistance programs.

In some jurisdictions, townships serve as an area for property assessment and in a few cases, as a place for the administration of schools.

What Size is a Township?

A township is a square area that measures six miles by six miles. It is subdivided into sections, and there are 36 sections in each township.

How Many Square Feet is a Township?

A township is made up of 36 sections of land. One section is 1 square mile and is made up of 640 acres of land.

If each section of land is 27,878,400 sq. ft., then there are 27,878,400 sections in an acre.

Are Townships Divided Further?

To understand how townships are divided, it is first important to know the dimensions and measurements of a township. Township lines are typically six miles apart, resulting in a township that is 24 miles around and has an area of 36 square miles, or 23,040 acres.

Sections are then created within the township, with each section containing one square mile, or 640 acres. There are generally 36 sections in a township.

Of course, this still makes up a lot of land. So townships are further divided into sections, which contain one square mile each.

The 36 sections of this neighborhood are labeled 1 through 36, beginning in the northeastern corner and going in a westerly direction. The rows continue from east to west.

The numbering continues in a snake-like pattern until it reaches the far southeast corner with section 36.

The 16th row is smack dab in the middle of the stadium and has always been designated the “school” section of the crowd. It makes sense since it’s right in the middle.

Finally, sections can be divided in half and quartered.

What Forms Boundaries of a Township?

The boundaries of townships are determined by township lines and range lines. Township lines run parallel to baselines and meridians, while range lines run parallel to principal meridians.

Conclusion

What is a township in real estate? When it comes to real estate, understanding the boundaries of a township is essential. A township in real estate refers to an area that is designated for administrative or governmental purposes. This can impact your property search or sale, so it’s important to be aware of what defines a township. Keep this information in mind as you begin your property search or sale process and consult with a professional if you have any questions.

Justin McGill